Jan 112018
 
How many U.S. states are at least partly north of the southernmost part of Canada?

Brain Teaser Of The Day: States North Of Canada

 

Famous U.S. Buildings And Landmarks Were Built With Slave Labor

 Political  Comments Off on Famous U.S. Buildings And Landmarks Were Built With Slave Labor
Aug 152017
 

The White House, The Capitol and other historic US buildings were built, in part, using slave labor. Using Liberal Logic… They MUST be torn down now!

Famous U.S. Buildings And Landmarks Were Built With Slave Labor

From Curbed:

Michelle Obama’s DNC speech was a reminder that slave labor helped build the White House. It helped build these other famous structures, too.

1 U.S. Capitol Building

In 2012, Congress unveiled an historic marker that commemorated the slave labor that went into the construction of the capitol. The area where the legislative center of the U.S. sits was previously known as Jenkins Hill, a heavily forested area that required extensive landscaping, as well as trench digging for the foundation, from slaves, all before George Washington laid the cornerstone in 1793. According to Fred Beuttler, a Historian for the House of Representatives, one of the building’s most iconic symbols, the brass Statue of Freedom, was in part, fashioned through the efforts of a Philip Reid, a former slave. In 1863, after the Emancipation Proclamation had been delivered, Reid helped work with the plaster model delivered by sculptor Thomas Crawford, and forged Crawford’s model. In addition, according to Beuttler, some of the sandstone in the old east front of the building contains the names of slave laborers who had cut the stone.

 
 
 

These 9 Words Can Tell Where You Grew Up

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Jul 242017
 

If said a certain way, these words and phrases are a dead giveaway to where you’re from.

 
In his book “Speaking American” Josh Katz learned that some words are dead giveaways for where an American grew up.

“Some words are like out-of-state license plates—they’re dead giveaways that you’re not from around here. Just try rhyming aunt with can’t in parts of the Northeast or Upper Midwest (you cahn’t) or ordering a sub in Philadelphia, the epicenter of hoagie country.

In recent years, linguists have pondered whether the homogenizing effects of TV, film, and the Internet have begun to eliminate many so-called regionalisms. To find out, I surveyed Americans about how we talk for my book, Speaking American.”

What we call insects that glow at night

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 

What we call a sale of household items

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 

How we address a group of people

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 

What we call carbonated beverages

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

Where we throw our trash

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 

What we haul freight in

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 

What we drink from in public places

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 

What we call athletic footwear

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 

How many syllables in caramel?

Say These 9 Words And We’ll Tell You Where You Grew Up

 
 
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The True Size Of The Moon

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Jun 102017
 

And now for a sense of scale: a map of the U.S. overlaid on the Moon

The True Size Of The Moon

The greatest distance between two points within the contiguous U.S. is 2,892 miles, stretching from Point Arena, CA to West Quoddy Head, ME*. The circumference of the Moon is 6,784. To help put the scale of each into perspective, redditor boredboarder8 decided to overlay one on top of the other, giving rise to the approximation you see above. [Click here for hi-res]

Writes boredboarder8:

It was difficult for me to fathom the size of the moon, thus inspiring the creation of this map. For me, this map puts the scale of the moon much smaller than I previously imagined. But it’s really interesting hearing how others (already grasping the size of the moon) now see the US as larger. [Ed.: ‘MURICA, amirite?]

It was one definitely a weird challenge to take a “flat” map of something on a sphere and project it onto a smaller sphere. Got mindfucked a few times along the way. Certainly take it only as an approximation, but what intrigued me the most is that the distance spanning the continental United States is roughly equal to a little less than half the circumference of the moon.

We repeat: this is just a rough estimate, but it’s certainly good enough for government work when it comes to illustrating the Moon’s relative dinkiness. (Or America’s hulking hugeness, depending on how patriotic you’re feeling.)

It’s strange — when we imagine objects in our solar system (even ones we know to be “small,” relative to other celestial bodies) I suspect that many of us regard them as just being unrelatably huge. They exist at scales so large, and at distances so vast, that numbers relating to mass, surface area and volume — descriptive though they may be — are rendered effectively meaningless.

So it’s always nice when images like this come along that help put things into perspective, whether it’s a side-by-side comparison of all the water on Earth relative to the Earth itself, a figure illustrating there’s more water on Jupiter’s moon Europa than there is on Earth, or a map of the U.S. slapped across the Moon’s near-side.

 

 
 
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State To Country Gun Ownership Comparison

 Infographics, Information  Comments Off on State To Country Gun Ownership Comparison
Apr 192017
 
This map shows how all 50 States rank on gun ownership compared to nations around the world.

State To Country Gun Ownership Comparison

The Second Amendment of the United States Constitution states: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

While it’s under constant debate whether having a passel of pistol-packing people is a help or hindrance to the security of our free State in 2015, there’s still a desire to make sure we’re protected should any need arise.

So, where do we stand in the “right to bear arms” discussion? Well, truth be told, we here at the Movoto Real Estate Blog would rather play with numbers and offer everyone an interesting perspective of the issue.

That said, what, we asked, would it look like if we compared gun ownership in our 50 states with gun ownership in other countries? You can see our answer above, and read about how we arrived at it below.

Methodology: What Triggered Our Conclusions

We started with a research group in Switzerland called Small Arms Survey and its report “Small Arms Survey 2007: Guns and the City.” Among other things, it estimated gun-ownership numbers for 178 countries, including the United States (which it estimates has about 270 million guns).

We then took the estimate of 88.8 guns per 100 people for the U.S.—which, seven years later, is likely higher—and used it to calculate each state’s estimated gun ownership, based on state populations from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2010 survey. (Of course, gun-ownership density varies throughout the country, but this number gave us a easy way to come up with comparable figures for all 50 states, since actual state-to-state numbers were not available.)

Once we had the list of state numbers, we compared each one to Small Arms Survey’s list of countries and respective gun-ownership estimates, logging the nearest match.

Under The Gun: A Quick Peek At The Results

As you’d expect, the United States’ “superpowers” match up with some of the world’s superpowers:

  • California’s total of 33.08 million guns is closest to China’s 40 million
  • Texas’ total of 22.33 million guns is closest to Germany’s 25 million
  • New York’s total of 17.2 million guns is closest to Pakistan’s 18 million

Interestingly enough, the next biggest state, Florida, is closest to Mexico (16.7 million vs. 15.5 million). Given their proximity, let’s hope they don’t meet in a shootout, because it probably won’t end like a proverbial Mexican Standoff.

The number of different countries on our comparison map is 32. (That number could have ended up higher, but we didn’t list multiple countries in the event of they were tied on the Small Arms Survey list.)

The countries with the most appearances on the list:

  • South Africa: 6
  • Spain: 5
  • Uzbekistan: 3
  • Turkey: 3

Source…

State To Country Gun Ownership Comparison

 

NUKEMAP

 Amusing, Political  Comments Off on NUKEMAP
Feb 152017
 
The nuclear bomb simulator that lets users nuke their home cities.

NUKEMAP

NUKEMAP is an interactive map using Google Maps API and unclassified nuclear weapons effects data, created by Alex Wellerstein, a historian of science at the Stevens Institute of Technology who studies the history of nuclear weapons. The initial version was created in February 2012, with major upgrades in July 2013, which enables users to model the explosion of nuclear weapons (contemporary, historical, or of any given arbitrary yield) on virtually any terrain and at virtually any altitude of their choice. A variation of the script, NUKEMAP3D, features rough models of mushroom clouds in 3D, scaled to their appropriate sizes. NUKEMAP3D doesn’t work on most browsers anymore for NPAPI plugins are no longer supported by them.

The computer simulation of the effects of nuclear detonations has been described both as “stomach-churning” (by Wellerstein himself) and as “the most fun I’ve had with Google Maps since… well, possibly ever” despite the admittedly abjectly grim nature of the subject. Originally intended in part as a pedagogical device to illustrate the stark difference in scale between fission and fusion bombs, more than three million people as of 2012 have exploded some 30 million virtual nuclear warheads; having gone viral, the increased popularity of the website necessitated a move to new servers. The website averages five “nukes” per visitor. According to the site’s own counter, in November 2016 users had simulated over 90 million nuclear explosions.

The NUKEMAP was a finalist for the National Science Foundation’s Visualization Challenge in 2014.

Users can select the location and size of the bombs.
The site shows the spread of the mushroom cloud including casualty numbers.

NUKEMAP
This map created by nuclear weapon historian Alex Wellerstein demonstrates the fallout caused by 2.3 megaton bomb dropped on Washington. It was modeled on the Soviet weapons held during the Cuban Missile Crisis of the 1960s