Aug 162017
 

On the Left, the 1932 flag of the paramilitary wing of the Communist Party of Germany. On the Right, the 2017 flag of the paramilitary wing of the Democratic Party of America.

Antifa Flag Comes Directly From The German Communist Party In 1932

Everything theses Alt-Left thugs use today is exactly the same as back then. Their logo, weaponized words, double standards and lack of logic. Its all from Germany 85 years ago. They call everyone Nazis because that is who their opposition in Germany was. Antifa prefaced The National Socialist German Workers’ Party and empowered them. Without Antifa’s violence the Nazi party would have never won anything.

Antifaschistische Aktion

The first German movement to call itself Antifaschistische Aktion was proclaimed by the German Communist Party (KPD) in their newspaper Rote Fahne in 1932 and held its first rally in Berlin on 10 July 1932, then capital of the Weimar Republic. During the early 1930s amidst rising tensions between Nazis and the communists, Berlin in particular has been the site of regular and often very violent clashes between the two groups. In May 1932, the communist paramilitary organisation Rotfrontkämpferbund had been banned and, following a skirmish between Nazi and communist members in the parliament, the Antifaschistische Aktion was founded to ensure that the communists had still a militant wing to rival the paramilitary organisations of the Nazis. After the forced dissolution in the wake of the Machtergreifung in 1933, the movement was revived during the 1980s.

One of the biggest antifascist campaigns in Germany in recent years was the, ultimately successful, effort to block the annual Nazi-rallies in the east German city of Dresden in Saxony, which had grown into “Europe’s biggest gathering of Nazis”.

In October 2016, the Antifa in Dresden campaigned on the occasion of the anniversary of the reunification of Germany on 3 October for “turning Unity celebrations into a disaster” („Einheitsfeierlichkeiten zum Desaster machen“), to protest this display of new German nationalism, whilst explicitly not ruling out the use of violence.

"Come to us" Poster of Antifaschistische Aktion (1932)
“Come to us” Poster of Antifaschistische Aktion (1932)

The picture below is from the leftist run Wikipedia. This is the description under the picture on Wikipedia:
“Karl-Liebknecht-Haus, the KPD’s headquarters from 1926 to 1933. The KPD leaders were arrested by the Gestapo in this building in January 1933, when Hitler became Chancellor. The plaques on either side of the door recall the building’s history. Today it is the Berlin headquarters of the Left Party.”

"Karl-Liebknecht-Haus, the KPD's headquarters from 1926 to 1933

 

 

Chemical Weapons In World War I

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Jul 132017
 

Chemical Weapons In World War I

Although the use of toxic chemicals as weapons dates back thousands of years, the first large scale use of chemical weapons was during World War I. They were primarily used to demoralize, injure, and kill entrenched defenders, against whom the indiscriminate and generally very slow-moving or static nature of gas clouds would be most effective. The types of weapons employed ranged from disabling chemicals, such as tear gas, to lethal agents like phosgene, chlorine, and mustard gas. This chemical warfare was a major component of the first global war and first total war of the 20th century. The killing capacity of gas was limited, with only about 90 thousand fatalities from a total of some 1.2 million casualties caused by gas attacks. Gas was unlike most other weapons of the period because it was possible to develop effective countermeasures, such as gas masks. In the later stages of the war, as the use of gas increased, its overall effectiveness diminished. The widespread use of these agents of chemical warfare, and wartime advances in the composition of high explosives, gave rise to an occasionally expressed view of World War I as “the chemist’s war” and also the era where “weapons of mass destruction” were created.
The use of poison gas performed by all major belligerents throughout World War I constituted war crimes as its use violated the 1899 Hague Declaration Concerning Asphyxiating Gases and the 1907 Hague Convention on Land Warfare, which prohibited the use of “poison or poisoned weapons” in warfare.

 

Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Greek Mosaics In Pristine Condition

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May 032017
 

Archaeologists have unearthed three stunning mosaics in southern Turkey. The beautifully preserved works have been dated to the ancient Greek city of Zeugma, founded more than 2,000 years ago by one of Alexander the Great’s generals.

Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Greek Mosaics In Pristine Condition

Imagine the thrill of unearthing three ancient greek mosaics dating back 2,220 years ago. Back in 2014, Professor Kutalmış Görkay of Ankara University and his team of archaeologists discovered three ancient Greek mosaics in the Turkish city of Zeugma near the border of Syria.

For some context, back in 2007, Zeugma was expecting a flood due to constructions of a dam. The archeologist team feared that they would lose the ancient treasures of Zeugma to this flood and immediately began their expeditions.

Upon their search for ancient treasures, they stumbled upon three ancient Greek mosaics belonging to the 2nd century BC. The mosaics, shockingly, were uncovered in almost pristine condition. Although the Zeugma city is now 80 percent underwater, the team continues their searches in hopes of unveiling hidden artifacts.

Here are some of the gorgeous artifacts discovered.

Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Greek Mosaics In Pristine Condition

Above is a mosaic of the Nine Muses: Clio, Euterpe, Thalia, Melpomene, Terpsichore, Erato, Polymnia, Ourania, and Calliope. Back in the renaissance days, the Nine muses were an inspiration to artists since they were the first ones to discover many art forms. Many artists did art works on the nine Muse as a dedication and recognition of their importance.

Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Greek Mosaics In Pristine Condition

Pictured above, Oceanus- the divine personification of the sea and his sister, Tethys- the embodiment of the waters of the world.

According to Professor Görkay, back in the 2nd century BC, many homes had mosaics in them. Mosaics in homes held a social aspect. Guests often times would admire the works of arts while drinking and chatting with the homeowners. Subject matters were taken into consideration and put into specific rooms. E.g. a bedroom perhaps may have a mosaic that portrayed lovers such as Eros and Telete.

Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Greek Mosaics In Pristine Condition

The mosaic above, Thalia- the muse of comedy and idyllic poetry is beautifully intact.

Experts commented on Thalia’s face saying how the mosaic required special pieces of glass that are used specifically for this mosaic’s face alone. The mosaic of Thalia is vivid as it is aesthetically pleasing. A wonder piece of art discovered by the archaeologists.

Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Greek Mosaics In Pristine Condition

In the mosaic above, a well known Greek God, Poseidon- God of the sea.

For a little history about the city of Zeugma, back in the early BCs the city was very important due to its location. The city being geographically located on the borders of the Greco-Roman world and the Persian Empire, it acted as a bridge which everyone had to cross.

Eventually, as the Roman empire started to decline, so did the Zeugma city. As Zeugma finally fell in AD 253 when Sassanids from Persia attacked the city, the city has been forgotten until the recent expeditions unveiling the buried treasures.

 

 
 
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Andor vs. And/Or

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Apr 112017
 

In February 1953 The Georgia House of Representatives voted to make “andor” a legal word and directed that it should henceforth be used in place of the phrase “and/or.” The House defined “andor” to mean, “either, or, both, and, and or or, and and or.”

However, the Georgia Senate voted against the bill.

More info: NY Times (Feb 21, 1953)

Andor vs. And/Or

Minneapolis Star Tribune – Feb 28, 1953

The East Liverpool (Ohio) Evening Review - Feb 26, 1953

The East Liverpool (Ohio) Evening Review – Feb 26, 1953

 
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Adolf Hitler: Dictator And ‘Super Junkie’

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Feb 242017
 
Hitler allegedly developed addiction to a heroin-like substance that ruined his veins and could be responsible for his ‘erratic’ actions.

Adolf Hitler: Dictator And 'Super Junkie'

A newly translated German book examines in detail how Hitler during the Second World War relied on a cocktail of animal hormones, vitamins, narcotics, and cocaine.

The article drew on an extract derived from Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany, published in the Daily Mail. Author Norman Ohler wrote the dictator was a “super junkie,” and his favored drug contained oxycodone, known in Germany as Eukodal.

Hitler became hooked eventually on a mix of drugs administered by his personal physician, Theodor Morell, nicknamed the “Reich injection master.”

Morell explained how Hitler would go from fatigue and exhaustion to refreshed and very satisfied after the injection of a combination of newly developed vitamin and hormones.

In addition, he also supplied Hitler’s lover, Eva Braun, with a similar combination and other drugs to suppress her menstruation, so the duo had more time for intimacy. Morell was steadfast regarding the benefits of physical love including extramarital affairs if required. As written in the book, Morell recalled years after the war that Hitler had often canceled medical examinations to hide bodily wounds resulting from Braun’s forceful sexual behavior.

When the Red Army started conquering more territory in late 1944, Hitler became increasingly resistant to the drugs.

His veins were so damaged that veteran drug–injector Morell found difficulty penetrating them, Ohler wrote. The venous skin from so many perforations became scarred, inflamed and a strange shade of brown. Each injection made a new wound that connected with the previous one. It made an elongated, growing crust; what addicts call track marks, reports the Jerusalem Post.

Hitler’s suicide was assisted by drugs, as well, explained the author: with no Eukodal left he chose the bullet.

The book maintains that drugs for Nazis were first tried out with concentration camp prisoners.

In one instance using a cocaine chewing gum, prisoners at Sachsenhausen concentration camp were given very high doses of drugs such as 50 to 100 milligrams of pure cocaine in pill form, Pervitin (akin to crystal meth) as chewing gum, or 20 milligrams of cocaine also supplied as chewing gum.

Prisoners were then forced to march overnight to test the effects. Ohler wrote that after marching seven or eight hours, most stopped marching because of sore feet.

Adolf Hitler: Dictator and Drug Addict
 
 
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A Gorilla Named John Daniel

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Jan 312017
 
The ‘almost human’ gorilla who drank tea and went to school

A Gorilla Named John Daniel

John Daniel was no ordinary gorilla. For starters, he was called John Daniel. And he had his own bedroom, drank tea and cider, and could purportedly do his own washing up.

The extraordinary tale of the village that adopted its very own gorilla a century ago is told in a new local history book by a Gloucestershire historian.

Margaret Groom, an archivist at the Uley Society, unearthed a collection of photographs of John, which have been published in her book about the village’s history.

A Gorilla Named John Daniel

The book recounts how villagers in Uley adopted the lowland gorilla after he was captured in Gabon by French soldiers who shot his parents. In 1917, he was spotted for sale in a London department store by Uley resident Maj Rupert Penny, who paid £300 (about £20,000 in today’s money), and named him John Daniel.

Penny’s sister, Alyce Cunningham, raised John as a human boy in the village and used to send John on regular walks with the children of Uley junior school, according to Groom.

A Gorilla Named John Daniel

Groom told the Gloucestershire Live site: “Until recently, we had people that remembered him walking around the village with the children. He used to go into gardens and eat the roses.

“The children used to push him around in a wheelbarrow. He knew which house was good for cider, and would often go to that house to draw a mug of cider.

“He was also fascinated by the village cobbler, and would watch him repairing shoes. He had his own bedroom, he could use the light switch and toilet, he made his own bed and helped with the washing up.”

A Gorilla Named John Daniel

Cunningham would also take him to her London home in Sloane Street, where he would attend her dinner parties, drinking cups of tea in the afternoon, Groom said.

But the story of John Daniel has an unhappy ending. “When he grew to full size, Miss Cunningham couldn’t look after him any more,” said Groom. “She sold him to an American for a thousand guineas, believing that he would be sent to a home in Florida.”

Instead, he fell into the hands of Barnum and Bailey circus and was also displayed in the zoo at Madison Square Garden in New York, where his health deteriorated and it was believed he was pining for his former “mother”. Cunningham, alerted by the zoo, set sail immediately, but John Daniel died of pneumonia before she arrived.

A Gorilla Named John Daniel

His body was given to the American Museum of Natural History for preservation and went on display in the New York museum in 1922, where he remains.

John Daniel is to be the subject of art exhibitions to be held this year at Prema Arts Centre in Uley.

 
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Amazing Wartime Facts From WWII

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Jan 272017
 

Amazing Wartime Facts From WWII

  1. The first German serviceman killed in the war was killed by the Japanese (China, 1937)
  2. The first American serviceman killed was killed by the Russians (Finland 1940).
  3. The highest ranking American killed was Lt. Gen. Lesley McNair, killed by the US Army Air Corps.
  4. The youngest US serviceman was 12 year old Calvin Graham, USN. He was wounded in combat and given a Dishonorable Discharge for lying about his age. (His benefits were later restored by act of Congress).
  5. At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced “sink us”), the shoulder patch of the US Army’s 45th Infantry division was the Swastika, and Hitler’s private train was named “Amerika”. All three were soon changed for PR purposes.
  6. More US servicemen died in the Air Corps that the Marine Corps. While completing the required 30 missions, your chance of being killed was 71%. Not that bombers were helpless. A B-17 carried 4 tons of bombs and 1.5 tons of machine gun ammo. The US 8th Air Force shot down 6,098 fighter planes, 1 for every 12,700 shots fired.
  7. Germany’s power grid was much more vulnerable than realized. One estimate is that if just 1% of the bombs dropped on German industry had instead been dropped on power plants, German industry would have collapsed.
  8. Generally speaking, there was no such thing as an average fighter pilot. You were either an ace or a target. For instance, Japanese ace Hiroyoshi Nishizawa shot down over 80 planes. He died while a passenger on a cargo plane.
  9. It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th found with a tracer round to aid in aiming. That was a mistake. The tracers had different ballistics so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target, 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet, the tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. That was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.
  10. When allied armies reached the Rhine, the first thing men did was pee in it. This was pretty universal from the lowest private to Winston Churchill (who made a big show of it) and Gen. Patton (who had himself photographed in the act).
     
    Don’t believe me? Take a look at this:

    Amazing Wartime Facts From WWII

    Gen. Patton peeing in the Rhine.

  11. German Me-264 bombers were capable of bombing New York City but it wasn’t worth the effort.
  12. A number of air crewmen died of farts. (ascending to 20,000 ft. in an un-pressurized aircraft causes intestinal gas to expand 300%!)
  13. The Russians destroyed over 500 German aircraft by ramming them in midair (they also sometimes cleared minefields by marching over them). “It takes a brave man not to be a hero in the Red Army”. Joseph Stalin
  14. The US Army had more ships that the US Navy.
  15. The German Air Force had 22 infantry divisions, 2 armor divisions, and 11 paratroop divisions. None of them were capable of airborne operations. The German Army had paratroops who WERE capable of airborne operations.
  16. When the US Army landed in North Africa, among the equipment brought ashore were 3 complete Coca Cola bottling plants.
  17. Among the first “Germans” captured at Normandy were several Koreans. They had been forced to fight for the Japanese Army until they were captured by the Russians and forced to fight for the Russian Army until they were captured by the Germans and forced to fight for the German Army until they were capture by the US Army.
  18. The Graf Spee never sank, The scuttling attempt failed and the ship was bought by the British. On board was Germany’s newest radar system.
  19. One of Japan’s methods of destroying tanks was to bury a very large artillery shell with on ly the nose exposed. When a tank came near the enough a soldier would whack the shell with a hammer. “Lack of weapons is no excuse for defeat.” – Lt. Gen. Mataguchi
  20. Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the fire-fight. It would have been worse if there had been Japanese on the island.
  21. The MISS ME was an unarmed Piper Cub. While spotting for US artillery her pilot saw a similar German plane doing the same thing. He dove on the German plane and he and his co-pilot fired their pistols damaging the German plane enough that it had to make a forced landing. Whereupon they landed and took the Germans prisoner. It is unknown where they put them since the MISS ME only had two seats.
  22. Most members of the Waffen SS were not German.
  23. The only nation that Germany declared was on was the USA.
  24. During the Japanese attack on Hong Kong, British officers objected to Canadian infantrymen taking up positions in the officer’s mess. No enlisted men allowed!
  25. Nuclear physicist Niels Bohr was rescued in the nick of time from German occupied Denmark. While Danish resistance fighters provided covering fire he ran out the back door of his home stopping momentarily to grab a beer bottle full of precious “heavy water”. He finally reached England still clutching the bottle, which contained beer. Perhaps some German drank the heavy water…

 
As printed in, The Victory Division News. No. 4. December, 2000.

The Dumbest Deaths In Recorded History

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Jan 242017
 

The Dumbest Deaths in Recorded HistoryAttila the Hun:
One of the most notorious villains in history, Attila’s army had conquered all of Asia by 450 AD-from Mongolia to the edge of the Russian Empire-by destroying villages and pillaging the countryside.
How he died: He got a nosebleed on his wedding night.
In 453 AD, Attila married a young girl named Ildico. Despite his reputation for ferocity on the battlefield, he tended to eat and drink lightly during large banquets. On his wedding night, however, he really cut loose, gorging himself on food and drink. Sometime during the night he suffered a nosebleed, but was too drunk to notice. He drowned in his own blood and was found dead the next morning.

Tycho Brahe:
An important Danish astronomer of the 16th century. His ground breaking research allowed Sir Isaac Newton to come up with the theory of gravity.
How he died: Didn’t get to the bathroom in time.
In the 16th century, it was considered an insult to leave a banquet table before the meal was over. Brahe, known to drink excessively, had a bladder condition-but failed to relieve himself before the banquet started. He made matters worse by drinking too much at dinner, and was too polite to ask to be excused. His bladder finally burst, killing him slowly and painfully over the next 11 days.

Horace Wells:
Pioneered the use of anesthesia in the 1840s
How he died: Used anesthetics to commit suicide.
While experimenting with various gases during his anesthesia research, Wells became addicted to chloroform. In 1848 he was arrested for spraying two women with sulfuric acid. In a letter he wrote from jail, he blamed chloroform for his problems, claiming that he’d gotten high before the attack. Four days later he was found dead in his cell. He’d anaesthetized himself with chloroform and slashed open his thigh with a razor.

Francis Bacon:
One of the most influential minds of the late 16th century. A statesman, a philosopher, a writer, and a scientist, he was even rumored to have written some of Shakespeare’s plays.
How he died: Stuffing snow into a chicken
One afternoon in 1625, Bacon was watching a snowstorm and was struck by the wondrous notion that maybe snow could be used to preserve meat in the same way that salt was used. Determined to find out, he purchased a chicken from a nearby village, killed it, and then, standing outside in the snow, attempted to stuff the chicken full of snow to freeze it. The chicken never froze, but Bacon did.

Jerome Irving Rodale:
Founding father of the organic food movement, creator of “Organic Farming and Gardening” magazine, and founder of Rodale Press, a major publishing corporation.
How he died: On the “Dick Cavett Show”, while discussing the benefits of organic foods.
Rodale, who bragged “I’m going to live to be 100 unless I’m run down by a sugar-crazed taxi driver,” was only 72 when he appeared on the “Dick Cavett Show” in January 1971. Part way through the interview, he dropped dead in his chair. Cause of death: heart attack. The show was never aired.

Aeschylus:
A Greek playwright back in 500 BC. Many historians consider him the father of Greek tragedies.
How he died: An eagle dropped a tortoise on his head
According to legend, eagles picked up tortoises and attempt to crack them open by dropping them on rocks. An eagle mistook Aeschylus’ head for a rock (he was bald) and dropped it on him instead.

Jim Fixx:
Author of the best selling “Complete Book of Running,” which started the jogging craze of the 1970s.
How he died: A heart attack….while jogging
Fixx was visiting Greensboro, Vermont when he walked out of his house and began jogging. He’d only gone a short distance when he had a massive coronary. His autopsy revealed that one of his coronary arteries was 99% clogged, another was 80% obstructed, and a third was 70% blocked….and that Fixx had had three other attacks in the weeks prior to his death.

 

In 1935, Hitler’s Explorers Set Out On A Secret Quest To Begin A Colony On The Amazon River

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Jan 132017
 
In 1935, Hitler’s Explorers Set Out On A Secret Quest To Begin A Colony On The Amazon River

Nazi party had a plan for colonial enlargement. Photo Credit

Deep within Brazil’s Amazon rain forest, there’s a Nazi grave flanked by a towering cross with a swastika in a cemetery close to the isolated outpost of Laranjal do Jari. Inscribed on the cross in German is the name of Joseph Greiner who died there of fever on January 2, 1936 ‘in the service of German research.’

So what is it doing there? It’s the sole reminder of a little-known facet of history when Germany sought to found a colony there by bringing a swath of the Amazon River Basin into the Third Reich.

From 1935 to 1937, a team of Nazi explorers were in the region under the leadership of Otto Schulz-Kampfhenkel, a zoologist, documentary filmmaker, and member of Hitler’s SS. They chopped their way through the jungle around Brazil’s border with neighboring French Guiana. They collected indigenous jewelry, animal skulls, and studied topography along the 491-mile-long Jari River, an Amazon tributary.

The exploration began with the customary scientific appearances, explained Jens Glusing, a longtime correspondent for Der Spiegel, the German-language news outlet. He created a book explaining the Guyana Project. When the war began, Schulz-Kampfhenkel seized this opportunity for Nazi colonial enlargement.

He presented his plans to Heinrich Himmler, the head of the SS and the Gestapo, in 1940. The scheme was a way to curb the influence of the United States by taking control of French Guiana and the neighboring British and Dutch colonies. But the dream faded, and it might have been the expedition itself that doomed the venture.

Matters didn’t go well from the start. The expedition had a Heinkel 72 Seekadett seaplane, an example of Nazi industrial prowess – but it capsized after striking driftwood just a few weeks after the expedition started, National Post reported.

From then on they were compelled to rely on native tribes for their survival and finding their way through the jungle. Malaria and other ailments felled them. Schulz-Kampfhenkel, the expedition’s foreman, developed diphtheria and an unknown fever took Grenier’s life.

The mission was abandoned, and today only Grenier’s three-meter-high monument remains as the testament to their failed endeavors.

An archival image from a 1935 Nazi expedition to the Amazon rain forest, where expedition foreman Joseph Greiner died of an unspecified fever. The three-metre grave endures.

 
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Now And Then: The Mountain Retreat Of Adolf Hitler

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Nov 042016
 

This mesmerizing 52-minute video takes you on a walking tour of the picturesque yet disturbing sites of Adolf Hitler’s mountain hideaway.

From an aerial view, the camera zooms in on various points so that you have an idea of where things were in relation to each other and how expansive a semi-military complex it was.

When the videographer stops at a point of interest, a picture of that site from the Nazi era is superimposed on the video, showing the viewer a glimpse of the past.

Hitler’s Berghof

“These were the best times of my life. My great plans were forged here” ~ Adolf Hitler.

Hitler’s retreat in the mountains of Bavaria was one of the most important centers of government in the Third Reich. Hitler spent more time in the Berghof than in his Berlin office.

It was in this oversized chalet that Hitler planned the invasions of Poland, France and Russia and the events that would change the lives of millions.

Adolf Hitler’s interest in the hills above Berchtesgaden began in 1923, when he came to visit his friend and mentor, Dietrich Eckart, who was living at the Platterhof Hotel. Hitler traveled there under the name of “Herr Wolf” and held meetings with supporters in local guesthouses.

After he was released from Landsberg prison in 1926, following his unsuccessful coup in Munich, he came back to the Obersalzberg.

He stayed in a small cabin (no longer there) on the mountain near the Platterhof. The remainder of Mein Kampf was written during his visit there.

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