George Washington Wearing A Make America Great Cap

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Mar 272017
 

Please tell me this is photoshopped. Please?

George Washington Wearing A Make America Great Cap

Last Friday night at Mar-a-Lago the Republican Party of South Florida had its annual Lincoln Day Dinner. They created a program that you get if you go in, like you get a program at a ballgame. They had a little program with the agenda in it — who’s speaking, who’s saying what, how much to send to this person. It’s a fundraising thing.

Chelsea Clinton Hopes MAGA Hat on Pic of Lincoln Is Photoshopped

So on the front of the program is an artist’s drawing of Abe Lincoln wearing a red Make America Great cap It is a drawing. Chelsea Clinton saw it; she sent out a tweet: “Please tell me this is photoshopped. Please?” Meaning, it’s likely that Chelsea Clinton literally actually believed that Abraham Lincoln had worn a Make America Great cap and had been photographed wearing it back in 1863! She was serious. She was scared to death that Lincoln actually wore the hat.

 
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Similarities Between The Assassinations Of Lincoln And Kennedy

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Feb 012017
 
Comparing the Assassinations of Abraham Lincoln Abraham and John F. Kennedy.

Similarities Between The Assassinations Of Lincoln And Kennedy

American presidents Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy were both tragically assassinated during their terms in office. Both men were admired by many but actually hated by those who opposed their political views. Shortly after Kennedy was assassinated on 22 November 1963, a comparison of the circumstances of his death and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln on 14 April 1865 surfaced. That comparison pointed out some amazing coincidences.

Comparison of events

The following chart compares the amazing coincidences in the deaths of Lincoln and Kennedy. Some items that are commonly listed in this comparison have been deleted as incorrect, thanks to reader feedback.

Lincoln Kennedy
Lincoln was elected to Congress in 1846 Kennedy was elected to Congress in 1946
He was elected President in 1860 He was elected President in 1960
His wife lost a child while living in the White House His wife lost a child while living in the White House
He was directly concerned with Civil Rights He was directly concerned with Civil Rights
Lincoln had a secretary named Kennedy who told him not to go to the theater *1 Kennedy had a secretary named Lincoln who told him not to go to Dallas *2
Lincoln was shot in the back of the head in the presence of his wife Kennedy was shot in the back of the head in the presence of his wife
Lincoln shot in the Ford Theatre Kennedy shot in a Lincoln, made by Ford
He was shot on a Friday He was shot on a Friday
The assassin, John Wilkes Booth, was known by three names, comprised of fifteen letters The assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, was known by three names, comprised of fifteen letters
Booth shot Lincoln in a theater and fled to a warehouse *3 Oswald shot Kennedy from a warehouse and fled to a theater
Booth was killed before being brought to trial Oswald was killed before being brought to trial
There were theories that Booth was part of a greater conspiracy There were theories that Oswald was part of a greater conspiracy
Lincoln’s successor was Andrew Johnson, born in 1808 Kennedy’s successor was Lyndon Johnson, born in 1908
Andrew Johnson died 10 years after Lincoln’s death Lyndon Johnson died 10 years after Kennedy’s death

 
*1 Note: It is an urban myth that Lincoln had a secretary named Kennedy. There is no record of that.

*2 Note: There is no record whether or not Kennedy’s secretary warned him.

*3 Note: Booth actually fled to a farm and was killed in a tobacco barn. It might be a stretch to call it a warehouse. But two years after his death, Booth’s body was temporarily moved to a warehouse. Also, after the assassination, the government closed the Ford Theatre and turned it into a warehouse.

Other interesting facts

Some other interesting facts include:

Lincoln’s dream

Apparently Lincoln had a dream several days before the assassination that he had been killed. He told his wife that he had seen himself in a casket.

A Kennedy uncovers plot

In February 1861, there was a plot called the “Baltimore Plot” to assassinate Lincoln as he passed through the city. A NYPD offiicer, John Kennedy, claimed to have uncovered the plot. In 1951, a movie The Tall Target was made about the plot, staring Dick Powell as Kennedy.

Pet turkey names Jack

Also, Lincoln’s son Tad had a pet turkey named Jack. Tad asked his father not to kill the turkey for Thanksgiving. Although Harry S Truman started the official tradition, Lincoln was the first to “pardon” a Thanksgiving turkey. (Now what would be real interesting is if JFK had a pet named Abe or had pardoned someone by that name. Thus far, I haven’t heard of that.)

Skeptics disagree

Some skeptics say that you could take any two famous people and find a number of similar-type coincidences between them. The only problem with that theory is that there really haven’t been any listings of such comparisons. And certainly none has been as extensive as the Lincoln-Kennedy similarities.

Summary

Facts concerning the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy are amazingly similar. It is uncertain if such coincidences have any meaning, but they certainly are strange.

John Wilkes Booth and Lee Harvey Oswald

John Wilkes Booth | Lee Harvey Oswald

 
Source…

The Inauguration Of Abraham Lincoln

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Jan 192017
 
Democrats haven’t been this mad since Republicans freed the slaves.

The Inauguration Of Abraham Lincoln

The first inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as the 16th President of the United States was held on March 4, 1861, on the East Portico of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.. The inauguration marked the commencement of the first term of Abraham Lincoln as President and the only term of Hannibal Hamlin as Vice President. The presidential oath of office was administered to Lincoln by Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the United States.

This was the first time Lincoln appeared in public with a beard, which he had begun growing after being elected president, in response to a written request by 11-year-old Grace Bedell. This effectively made him the first President to have any facial hair beyond sideburns.

On Inauguration Day, Lincoln’s procession to the Capitol was surrounded by heavily armed cavalry and infantry, providing an unprecedented amount of protection for the President-elect as the nation stood on the brink of war. During the 16 weeks between Lincoln’s victory in the 1860 presidential election and Inauguration Day, seven slave states had declared their secession from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America.

Train ride to Washington

An entourage of family and friends left Springfield, Illinois with Lincoln on February 11 to travel by train to Washington, D.C. for the inauguration. This group including his wife, three sons, and brother-in-law, as well as John G. Nicolay, John M. Hay, Ward Hill Lamon, David Davis, Norman B. Judd, and Edwin Vose Sumner.

For the next ten days, he traveled widely throughout the country, with stops in Indianapolis, Columbus, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Buffalo, Albany, New York City, and south to Philadelphia, where on the afternoon of February 21, he pulled into Kensington Station. Lincoln took an open carriage to the Continental Hotel, with almost 100,000 spectators waiting to catch a glimpse of the President-elect. There he met Mayor Alexander Henry, and delivered some remarks to the crowd outside from a hotel balcony. Lincoln continued on to Harrisburg. Then, because of an alleged assassination conspiracy, Lincoln traveled through Baltimore, Maryland on a special train in the middle of the night before finally completing his journey in Washington.

Source…

 

Dec 222015
 

Technically Lincoln was not a Founding Father. But Lincoln’s legacy in history is as the Savior and Protector of the Union qualifies him for this comparison.

Unfounding Father Vs. Founding Father Round V

Previously:
Unfounding Father Vs. Founding Father
Unfounding Father Vs. Founding Father Round II
Unfounding Father Vs. Founding Father Round III
Unfounding Father Vs. Founding Father Round IV

 

Transcript Of Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address

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May 282015
 

Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address

The following is a transcript of President Lincoln’s speech from the Capitol on March 4, 1865 on his second inauguration:

“At this second appearing to take the oath of the presidential office, there is less occasion for an extended address than there was at the first. Then a statement, somewhat in detail, of a course to be pursued, seemed fitting and proper. Now, at the expiration of four years, during which public declarations have been constantly called forth on every point and phase of the great contest which still absorbs the attention, and engrosses the energies of the nation, little that is new could be presented. The progress of our arms, upon which all else chiefly depends, is as well known to the public as to myself; and it is, I trust, reasonably satisfactory and encouraging to all. With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.

On the occasion corresponding to this four years ago, all thoughts were anxiously directed to an impending civil-war. All dreaded it — all sought to avert it. While the inaugural address was being delivered from this place, devoted altogether to saving the Union without war, insurgent agents were in the city seeking to destroy it without war — seeking to dissolve the Union, and divide effects, by negotiation. Both parties deprecated war; but one of them would make war rather than let the nation survive; and the other would accept war rather than let it perish. And the war came.

One eighth of the whole population were colored slaves, not distributed generally over the Union, but localized in the Southern half part of it. These slaves constituted a peculiar and powerful interest. All knew that this interest was, somehow, the cause of the war. To strengthen, perpetuate, and extend this interest was the object for which the insurgents would rend the Union, even by war; while the government claimed no right to do more than to restrict the territorial enlargement of it.

Neither party expected for the war, the magnitude, or the duration, which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with, or even before, the conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God; and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God’s assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men’s faces; but let us judge not that we be not judged.

The prayers of both could not be answered; that of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has His own purposes. “Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh!” If we shall suppose that American Slavery is one of those offences which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South, this terrible war, as the woe due to those by whom the offence came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a Living God always ascribe to Him?

Fondly do we hope — fervently do we pray — that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue, until all the wealth piled by the bond-man’s two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash, shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said f[our] three thousand years ago, so still it must be said “the judgments of the Lord, are true and righteous altogether”

With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan — to achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves and with the world. to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace, among ourselves, and with the world. all nations.”

[Endorsed by Lincoln:]

Original manuscript of second Inaugural presented to Major John Hay.
A. Lincoln
April 10, 1865

 
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