Jun 142017
 
A great scientist named Roger Revelle had Al Gore in his class at Harvard and the Global Warming campaign was born. Revelle tried to calm things down years later, but Gore said Revelle was Senile and refused to debate. John Coleman documents the entire story and shows how our tax dollars are perpetuating the Global Warming alarmist campaign even though temperatures have not risen in years and years.

 
 

Jun 122017
 

Most of us have dealt with acne during puberty, or maybe even after that. You probably wanted to pop or pick them in order to remove them, but don’t do that! Learn more about acne and learn how to get rid of it more appropriately!

Enjoy!

Zits are annoying and they tend to pop up at the absolute worst time. Before you try to pop them, though, check out this video for some better ways to get rid of acne.

This video from SciShow explains how zits are formed when bacteria collect in the pores of your skin and create tiny infections. While popping a zit is an attractive short term solution, this can spread the infection to the surrounding area of your skin. That’s likely to make the overall problem worse.

Instead, the video suggests that acne treatments that prevent bacterial growth and lower inflammation. You can use over the counter topical treatments on your skin to help reduce acne overall. In severe cases of acne, you may want to look into prescription treatments.

Source…

 

Jun 102017
 

And now for a sense of scale: a map of the U.S. overlaid on the Moon

The True Size Of The Moon

The greatest distance between two points within the contiguous U.S. is 2,892 miles, stretching from Point Arena, CA to West Quoddy Head, ME*. The circumference of the Moon is 6,784. To help put the scale of each into perspective, redditor boredboarder8 decided to overlay one on top of the other, giving rise to the approximation you see above. [Click here for hi-res]

Writes boredboarder8:

It was difficult for me to fathom the size of the moon, thus inspiring the creation of this map. For me, this map puts the scale of the moon much smaller than I previously imagined. But it’s really interesting hearing how others (already grasping the size of the moon) now see the US as larger. [Ed.: ‘MURICA, amirite?]

It was one definitely a weird challenge to take a “flat” map of something on a sphere and project it onto a smaller sphere. Got mindfucked a few times along the way. Certainly take it only as an approximation, but what intrigued me the most is that the distance spanning the continental United States is roughly equal to a little less than half the circumference of the moon.

We repeat: this is just a rough estimate, but it’s certainly good enough for government work when it comes to illustrating the Moon’s relative dinkiness. (Or America’s hulking hugeness, depending on how patriotic you’re feeling.)

It’s strange — when we imagine objects in our solar system (even ones we know to be “small,” relative to other celestial bodies) I suspect that many of us regard them as just being unrelatably huge. They exist at scales so large, and at distances so vast, that numbers relating to mass, surface area and volume — descriptive though they may be — are rendered effectively meaningless.

So it’s always nice when images like this come along that help put things into perspective, whether it’s a side-by-side comparison of all the water on Earth relative to the Earth itself, a figure illustrating there’s more water on Jupiter’s moon Europa than there is on Earth, or a map of the U.S. slapped across the Moon’s near-side.

 

 
 
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Jun 052017
 
You will never feel so small in your entire life…

This video was generated using the iOS App “Cosmic Eye”, written by Danail Obreschkow at the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research at the University of Western Australia. Cosmic Eye drew inspiration from a progression of increasingly accurate graphical representations of the scales of our Universe, including the classical essay “Cosmic View” (1957), the short movie “Cosmic Zoom” (1968), directed by Eva Szasz, and “Powers of Ten” (1977), directed by Charles and Ray Eames. Where possible, it displays real photographs obtained with modern objectives, telescopes, and microscopes. Other views are phenomenal renderings of state-of-the-art computer models. All scientists and sources have given permission and are fully credited in the app.